Trying to bridge a router off my PC

Everything claims to be connected and working fine, but anything that I connect to the router can't get past the bridge.

Basically what I'm trying to do is: Modem > Router(1) > PC > *bridge* > Router(2) > Devices x20

Everything after the first router is via Wifi due to distance. I have a 10dB antennae on the PC network card to compensate, however the other devices don't (which is why I am trying to do what I am doing).

Tried disabling all firewall settings and whatnot. Router(2) shows the gateway as Router(1) (and not the PC) with regards to IPs, however router(2) cannot ping router(1).

What am I missing / doing wrong!

geek_volkier, Nov 18, 9:45 am

The PC has to route also, between wireless (bridge) and wired (connected to router) interfaces.

geek_spyware, Nov 18, 10:10 am

Can you point me in the right direction with where to find the settings for that! Using Win7 home premium.

geek_volkier, Nov 18, 10:37 am

Can you point me in the right direction with where to find the settings for that! Using Win7 home premium. Or do I need standalone software! Would be good to be explained to why it works without routing for a single PC bridge, but not a router too (cuz learning is fun and all that) :)

geek_volkier, Nov 18, 10:37 am

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Curr-
entControlSet\Services\Tcpip\P-
arameters

Value Name: IpEnableRouter
Value Data: 1

Enabled routing in Registry. Still no luck.

geek_volkier, Nov 18, 11:21 am

You typically use Internet Connection Sharing or Wingate, winProxy.

geek_spyware, Nov 18, 11:46 am

You will most likely need to add a static route so traffic is routed between your networks. i.e. any traffic from the router1 interface with a destination ip in the router2 network needs to be sent out the interface connected to rounter2 and vice versa.

this will help:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/sag_tcpip_pro_addstaticroute.mspx!mfr=true

geek_twaymouth, Nov 18, 11:49 am

You will most likely need to add a static route so traffic is routed between your networks. i.e. any traffic from the interface connected to router1 with a destination ip in the router2 network needs to be sent out the interface connected to rounter2 and vice versa.

this will help:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/sag_tcpip_pro_addstaticroute.mspx!mfr=true

geek_twaymouth, Nov 18, 11:49 am

for example lets assume that router1 uses the ip address 10.0.0.1/24 and router2 uses the address 192.168.1.1/24 router one is connected to eth1 on your pc and router 2 is connected to eth2

you would need to add two static routes so any traffic for the 10.0.0.0 network is sent out the eth1 interface and any traffic for the 192.168.1.0 network is sent out the eth2 interface

geek_twaymouth, Nov 18, 11:58 am

geek_twaymouth, Nov 18, 11:59 am

This would also bea slightly easier way to do it (essentially creates relevant static routes for you):
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/hnw_bridge_install.mspx!mfr=true

geek_twaymouth, Nov 18, 11:59 am

If router2 has gateway address of router1 you an unworkable situation anyway. Given gateway has to be on the same subnet it don't make sense as router1 LAN interface can not be on same subnet as router2 WAN interface if being routed through the PC (both PC interfaces have to be on different subnets for routing to be implemented).

geek_spyware, Nov 18, 12:17 pm

If router2 has gateway address of router1 you have an unworkable situation anyway. Given gateway has to be on the same subnet it don't make sense as router1 LAN interface can not be on same subnet as router2 WAN interface if being routed through the PC (both PC interfaces have to be on different subnets for routing to be implemented).

geek_spyware, Nov 18, 12:17 pm

Post your IP addressing/subnetting settings etc for each step. Also why is it set up this way!

geek_jcmp21, Nov 18, 1:52 pm

In any situation, wired is, and awayls will be the most reliable. If you don't want drops in your connection, i'd stick with a cable. If your insisting on using wireless, situate the wireless router as close to your desktop as you possibly could.Hope i've been of help.

geek_guest, Aug 3, 11:13 am

If ylou have the option, run the wire. Your contecnion will be significantly more reliable. Packet loss will be your doom on wireless which will cause significant lag. Something you dont need in a game that has its share of it anyway.

geek_guest, Aug 4, 2:21 am

This is usually done with BGP mhnliuomitg or PBR. I do PBR at my company. One link we use for voice and the other for general data. It is quite simple to do PBR, simple route map while setting the next hop default for the gateway and a match statement for the networks you want to route using an ACL. Another way I could think of doing it would be have two gateways, one for each ISP and just use GLBP to actually load balance the final gateway, since it uses a virtual IP and MAC, you can balance based on many factors (VRRP or HSRP could also accomplish something similar, but you would have to manually balance by source, much like PBR).Forgot to mention you could use NAT load balancing or PfR (used to be known as OER) to do this as well. Then there is always multiple default routes, you just have to have CEF enabled and pick your CEF load balance scheme.More info would help, but there is a ton of ways.CCNP, CCDP, CCIE written, Network Engineer for a Cisco partner

geek_guest, Aug 6, 2:22 am