Getting TV Reception help please.

suenz75, Feb 9, 8:42pm
I computing people, it was suggested in General that I ask my below question here:

I live in a place where the cladding seems to interfere with TV and Wireless Internet reception (I had to get a jackpoint and use an Ethernet cable to be able to use the Internet). I have a normal TV aerial on my roof into my lounge and have a Freeview TV but I can't always guarantee that I will have reception. And in my bedroom I also have a freeview TV with bunny ears (the ones that are supposed to be gruntier than the oldstyle bunny ears) but can't get any reception at all so that is used for DVDs only. So my question is do I need a different aerial to solve my reception problem and do I need to call an Electrician or TV Technician or both! Thanks. Sue

meathead_timaru, Feb 9, 9:12pm
You need an external aerial for the Freeview, probably because your signal there is less than ideal.

What do you mean by "wireless" internet! If wifi (wireless access to your wired broadband) it'll likely have nothing to do with building cladding and everything to do with a crappy router.


tmenz, Feb 9, 10:05pm
You need to post more information on here for a start, so we can give informed answers.
How old is your aerial.
What sort is it - description, photo!
Do you have a VCR connected!
Do you have any splitters fitted to the aerial!
etc.

spyware, Feb 9, 10:23pm
Your normal aerial is probably VHF (suitable for analog transmission of ONE, 2, 3, 4) so your UHF signal may be marginal. Typically you would call an antenna installer and have them measure the signal with a field strength meter and make the decision re: antenna model. Also need to run cable to bedroom. The days of using indoor antennas if you can't see the transmitter have gone given lower power nature of digital transmissions.

http://www.freeviewshop.co.nz/digital-terrestrial/terrestrial-aerials-c-11/conventional-aerials.html

suenz75, Feb 10, 12:08am
Thanks Spyware.My aerial is 6 years old, but it looks like I need a different type.My old TVs used to have pretty good reception actually and its only in the last couple of years since I have gotten flatscreens that I have been unable to get reception in my bedroom and had intermittent reception in the lounge (its really bad in wet weather) so it looks like my aerial is not suitable for flatscreens and I need to call a TV aerial person.Thanks for the other replies. Sue

spyware, Feb 10, 12:45am
Reliable reception all depends on the exact type of outdoor antenna you currently have and whether you have any other fault. Some antennas cover VHF band 1 + band 3 and UHF - if only 6 years old it would most likely cover all 3 bands. Tuning into analog Prime or Maori TV (UHF channels) will give you some indication of quality of UHF signal (for both your indoor aerial and outdoor). If analog UHF is snowy then digital UHF may be marginal as digital transmitter power is way lower than analog. Reception of ONE, 2 and 3 is irrelevant as they are on VHF band. You could have a fault with a termination or balun (connector box) at antenna end. Baluns can get rain in them.

The higher frequencies and lower power levels of digital DVB-T transmissions means that strength of signal within ahouse at several kilometers from transmitter can simply be too low for an indoor antenna to be of any use.

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